The State of Downtown Harrisburg: Part 2

Good news, everybody!  I just received word from Mayor Thompson that due to a very fortunate change in circumstances, the city will NOT be shutting down as was announced yesterday via Facebook.

Granted, the notion that this was a publicity stunt seems far more likely than the possibility that the city suddenly found some magical happy-time cure-all solution that they forgot existed and that staved off closing for now.

Because otherwise, they’d just be a bunch of obnoxious pricks.

Adventures in Huntingdon County

This past weekend I went off in search of some authentic Pennsylvania history with a very good friend.  During my years of research on the Abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike, I learned of a second rail tunnel through Sideling Hill.  Although the Abandoned Turnpike / South Penn RR history is fascinating in its own right, what we sought had nothing to do with either.  And thanks to a recent surge in interest in the Abandoned Turnpike (which I hope I’ve been at least a small part of), fewer Pennsylvanians have probably heard of our destination:  The East Broad Top Railroad.

Remember that with the exception of the Allegheny Mountain & Lehigh Valley tunnels, all of the PA Turnpike tunnels were once railroad tunnels for the never-finished South Penn.  The concrete shell you see today was built sometime between the late 1930s and early 1960s, depending on whether you’re travelling through the newer twinned tubes (mostly eastbound) or the original tunnels (mostly westbound).  All of the original tunnels date back to shortly after the Civil War.  I point this out only because in today’s Interstate-highway- and jet-based world, it’s easy to forget that railroads were once the dominant force in our economy.

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On Content Moderation

(Important note:  I am not a lawyer.  Nothing on this site, including this post, constitutes legal advice.  Everything in this post may be completely inaccurate; in fact, you should assume that it is.  Always consult a qualified attorney for legal guidance.)

There is a long-standing (and incorrect) Internet Urban Legend that has spent well over a decade misleading people who should know better.  The legend in question pertains to sites that contain user-submitted content, such as — for example — PennLive.  The legend goes something like this:

“If you edit, delete, or otherwise modify user-submitted content, you become responsible for said content and any legal ramifications it brings.”

This wildly-inaccurate assumption is regularly dispensed by Armchair Internet Lawyers and dime-a-dozen consultants.  And it needs to die.

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